How People Change (inbunden)
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Format
Inbunden (Hardback)
Språk
Engelska
Antal sidor
320
Utgivningsdatum
2017-05-09
Förlag
WW Norton & Co
Dimensioner
241 x 165 x 25 mm
Vikt
635 g
Antal komponenter
1
ISBN
9780393711769
How People Change (inbunden)

How People Change

Relationships and Neuroplasticity in Psychotherapy

Inbunden Engelska, 2017-05-09
419
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How People Change explores the complexities of attachment, the brain, mind and body as they aid change during psychotherapy. Research is presented about the properties of healing relationships and communication strategies that facilitate change in the social brain. Contributors include Irving Yalom, Peter Levine, Bruce Perry, Jessica Benjamin and others.
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This masterful collection of essays is rich with practical insights for psychotherapists, coaches, and really anyone who helps others change for the better. Far-reaching, lucid, full of heart, and highly recommended.--Rick Hanson, PhD, author of Buddha's Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom This is an excellent book not only for therapists, but also for those who study the philosophy of mind, for those looking at policy in societal change, insurance companies, and those who teach and practice body work such as yoga, tai chi, qigong, dance therapy, and more. . . . [I]t has been refreshing to read the different ways that extremely competent therapists work and in a variety of ways. . . . This book supports the importance of paying attention to the therapeutic relationship, to what clients want, and their own theory of how change occurs for them (and your ability to work with that). This book is well worth your time. I continue to refer to it. Each of the chapters--or better yet, each of the authors--in this book is authentic in the way that Bromberg uses in his chapter. Each therapist, and each is a master at doing therapy, expresses their individual struggle with the question of how change in therapy happens, and how to make meaning out of a change process that can only be apprehended through experience and eludes colonization by words. And yet something special goes on as you read the words. It will be a realization of authenticity between you and the writer, an expanding dyadic experience that is emergent and surpasses the limitations of language and symbols. It is a dyadic state bringing you a new clarity of expanding understanding of what you always knew but didn't know you knew.--Ed Tronick, PhD, Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Director, Child Development Unit Thoughtful and engaging. . . . [H]elpful in exposing readers to variations of psychodynamic practice. . . [Q]uite appropriate for trainees seeking to better understand how their time with patients can be transformative for patients and therapist alike. . . . [M]ay be particularly helpful for clinicians feeling burned-out and needing to recenter themselves in the meaningfulness of their work.

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Marion Solomon, Ph.D., is a lecturer at the David Geffen School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry at UCLA, and Senior Extension faculty at the Department of Humanities, Sciences and Social Sciences at UCLA. She is also director of clinical training at the Lifespan Learning Institute and author of Narcissism and Intimacy, co-author of Short Term Therapy For Long Term Change, and co-editor of Countertransference in Couples Therapy and Healing Trauma. Daniel J. Siegel, MD is a graduate of Harvard Medical School and completed his postgraduate medical education at UCLA with training in pediatrics and child, adolescent, and adult psychiatry. He is currently a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, founding co-director of UCLA's Mindful Awareness Research Center, founding co-investigator at the UCLA Center for Culture, Brain and Development, and executive director of the Mindsight Institute, an educational center devoted to promoting insight, compassion, and empathy in individuals, families, institutions, and communities. Dr. Siegel's psychotherapy practice spans thirty years, and he has published extensively for the professional audience. He serves as the Founding Editor for theNorton Professional Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology which includes over three dozen textbooks. Dr. Siegel's books include Mindsight, Pocket Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology, The Developing Mind, Second Edition, The Mindful Therapist, The Mindful Brain, Parenting from the Inside Out (with Mary Hartzell, M.Ed.), and the three New York Times bestsellers: Brainstorm, The Whole-Brain Child (with Tina Payne Bryson, Ph.D.), and his latest No-Drama Discipline (with Tina Payne Bryson, Ph.D.). He has been invited to lecture for the King of Thailand, Pope John Paul II, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Google University, and TEDx. For more information about his educational programs and resources, please visit: www.DrDanSiegel.com.