Timescapes of Modernity (häftad)
Format
Häftad (Paperback / softback)
Språk
Engelska
Antal sidor
256
Utgivningsdatum
1998-03-01
Förlag
Routledge
Illustrationer
8 b&w photographs
Dimensioner
245 x 170 x 13 mm
Vikt
480 g
Antal komponenter
1
ISBN
9780415162753
Timescapes of Modernity (häftad)

Timescapes of Modernity

The Environment and Invisible Hazards

Häftad Engelska, 1998-03-01
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Timescapes of Modernity explores the relationship between time and environmental and socio-cultural concerns. Using examples such as the BSE crisis, the Sea Empress oil pollution and the Chernobyl radiation Barbara Adam argues that environmental hazards are inescapably tied to the successes of the industrial way of life. Global markets and economic growth; large-scale production of food; the speed of transport and communication; the 24 hour society and even democratic politics are among the invisible hazards we face. With this unique 'timescape' perspective the author dislodges assumptions about environmental change, enables a rethinking of environmental problems and provides the potential for new strategies to deal with environmental hazards.
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"Stimulating - drawing out ideas in a novel and refreshing way" Dr Paul S Ganderton, Teaching Ecology Group 'Timescapes of Modernity represents an important argument for the centrality of time in generating,defining and responding to environmental issues. It deserves to be widely read within academic and policy circles' Hilary Rose, Research Professor, City University London - Time and Society Vol 9 (1) 'The book is a truly worthwhile read' - Anne Buttimer, University College Dublin - Progress in Human Geography 25,2 (2001)