Let Nobody Turn Us Around (häftad)
Format
Häftad (Paperback / softback)
Språk
Engelska
Antal sidor
708
Utgivningsdatum
2009-02-28
Upplaga
Second Edition
Förlag
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Medarbetare
Carmichael (Kwame Ture), Stokely (contributions)/Abu-Jamal, Mumia (contributions)/Allen, Richard (contributions)/Asante, Molefi (contributions)/Baldwin, James (contributions)/Baraka, Amiri (contributions)/Blyden, Edward Wilmot (contributions)/Briggs, Cyril V. (contributions)/Carmichael (Kwame Ture),
Illustrationer
Black & white illustrations
Dimensioner
221 x 152 x 38 mm
Vikt
885 g
Antal komponenter
1
Komponenter
23:B&W 6 x 9 in or 229 x 152 mm Perfect Bound on White w/Gloss Lam
ISBN
9780742560574
Let Nobody Turn Us Around (häftad)

Let Nobody Turn Us Around

An African American Anthology

Häftad Engelska, 2009-02-28
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This anthology of black writers traces the evolution of African-American perspectives throughout American history, from the early years of slavery to the end of the twentieth century. The essays, manifestos, interviews, and documents assembled here, contextualized with critical commentaries from Marable and Mullings, introduce the reader to the character and important controversies of each period of black history. The selections represent a broad spectrum of ideology. Conservative, radical, nationalistic, and integrationist approaches can be found in almost every period, yet there have been striking shifts in the evolution of social thought and activism. The editors judiciously illustrate how both continuity and change affected the African-American community in terms of its internal divisions, class structure, migration, social problems, leadership, and protest movements. They also show how gender, spirituality, literature, music, and connections to Africa and the Caribbean played a prominent role in black life and history.
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Praise for the first edition: No other anthology so fully incorporates views from African American women as well as men, workers as well as intellectuals, and individuals from diverse political perspectives..... -- Johnnetta B. Cole, president emerita of Spelman and Bennett Colleges Praise for the first edition: A remarkably broad compilation of the signal primary sources through which black people articulated both their always shifting and always various definitions of what, precisely, a black identity is, as well as the most efficacious methods through which to achieve our freedom. Marable and Mullings have produced a work indispensable to the field of African-American Studies.... -- Henry Louis Gates Jr., Harvard University Praise for the first edition: Manning Marable and Leith Mullings's text gives us a powerful interpretation and compilation of exemplary voices in the black past and present. Their progressive vision is a breath of fresh air and badly needed in these times.... -- Cornel West, Union Theological Seminary Praise for the first edition: A readable, comprehensive, fascinating and thick anthology of African American documents that are as gripping as they are informative. Powerful, dramatic, hard to put down, this comprehensive volume of both significant leaders and ordinary people with highly perceptive views, should find a place in many college courses.... * Afro Times * Praise for the first edition: There is no comparable volume that can match the comprehensive coverage in this first, single-volume documentary history of black thought. . . . Essential reading..... -- George M. Fredrickson, Stanford University Praise for the first edition: Manning Marable and Leith Mullings's text gives us a powerful interpretation and compilation of exemplary voices in the black past and present. Their progressive vision is a breath of fresh air and badly needed in these times. -- Cornel West, Union Theological Seminary Praise for the first edition: No other anthology so fully incorporates views from African American women as well as men, workers as well as intellectuals, and individuals from diverse political perspectives. -- Johnnetta B. Cole, president emerita of Spelman and Bennett Colleges Praise for the first edition: There is no comparable volume that can match the comprehensive coverage in this first, single-volume documentary history of black thought. . . . Essential reading. -- George M. Fredrickson, Stanford University Praise for the first edition: A remarkably broad compilation of the signal primary sources through which black people articulated both their always shifting and always various definitions of what, precisely, a black identity is, as well as the most efficacious methods through which to achieve our freedom. Marable and Mullings have produced a work indispensable to the field of African-American Studies. -- Henry Louis Gates Jr., Harvard University Praise for the first edition: A readable, comprehensive, fascinating and thick anthology of African American documents that are as gripping as they are informative. Powerful, dramatic, hard to put down, this comprehensive volume of both significant leaders and ordinary people with highly perceptive views, should find a place in many college courses. * Afro Times * Praise for the first edition: The editors make the crucial argument that the themes of reform, resistance, and renewal formed the cultural and social matrix of black consciousness, community, and public discourse. They identify the key debates in the black community throughout American history and provide an analytical framework of the major tendencies. They also make a forceful argument for making the issue of gender a central one throughout this important volume. * Race Relations Abstracts * Praise for the first edition: It is an excellent work of scholarship and a reference that belongs in the homes of all Black Americans. * Www.Bookviews.Com * Praise for the first edition: Douglas and Malcol

Övrig information

Manning Marable is M. Moran Weston and Black Alumni Professor of African-American Studies and Director of the Center for Contemporary Black History at Columbia University. Leith Mullings is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York.

Innehållsförteckning

Part 1 Preface to the First Edition Part 2 Preface to the Second Edition Part 3 Introduction: Resistance, Reform, and Renewal in the Black Experience Part 4 Section 1. Foundations: Slavery and Abolitionism, 1768-1861 Part 5 1. "On Being Brought from Africa to America" Part 6 2. "The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano" Part 7 3. "Thus Doth Ethiopia Stretch Forth Her Hand from Slavery, to Freedom and Equality" Part 8 4. The Founding of the African Methodist Episcopal Church Part 9 5. David Walker's "Appeal," 1829-1830 Part 10 6. The Statement of Nat Turner, 1831 Part 11 7. Slaves are Prohibited to Read and Write by Law Part 12 8. "What If I Am a Woman?" Part 13 9. A Slave Denied the Rights to Marry, Letter of Milo Thompson, Slave, 1834 Part 14 10. The Selling of Slaves, Advertisement, 1835 Part 15 11. Solomon Northrup Describes a New Orleans Slave Auction, 1841 Part 16 12. Cinque and the Amistad Revolt, 1841 Part 17 13. "Let Your Motto Be Resistance!" Part 18 14. "Slavery as It Is" Part 19 15. "A'nt' I a Woman?" Part 20 16. "A Plea for Emigration, or, Notes of Canada West" Part 21 17. A Black Nationalist Manifesto Part 22 18. "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" Part 23 19. "No Rights That a White Man Is Bound to Respect:" The Dred Scott Case and Its Aftermath Part 24 20. "Whenever the Colored Man Is Elevated, It Will Be by His Own Exertions" Part 25 21. The Spirituals: "Go Down Moses" and "Didn't My Lord Deliver Daniel" Part 26 Section 2. Reconstruction and Reaction: The Aftermath of Slavery and the Dawn of Segregation, 1861-1915 Part 28 1. "What the Black Man Wants" Part 29 2. Henry McNeal Turner, Black Christian Nationalist Part 30 3. Black Urban Workers during Reconstruction Chapter 31 Anonymous Document on the National Colored Labor Convention, 1869 Chapter 32 New York Tribune Article on African-American Workers, 1870 Part 33 4. "Labor and Capital Are In Deadly Conflict" Part 34 5. Edward Wilmot Blyden and the African Diaspora Part 35 6. "The Democratic Idea Is Humanity" Part 36 7. "A Voice from the South" Part 37 8. The National Association of Colored Women: Mary Church Terrell and Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin Part 38 9. "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" Part 39 10. Booker T. Washington and the Politics of Accommodation Chapter 40 "Atlanta Exposition Address" Chapter 41 "My View of Segregation Laws" Part 42 11. William Monroe Trotter and the Boston Guardian Part 43 12. Race and the Southern Worker Chapter 44 "A Negro Woman Speaks" Chapter 45 "The Race Question a Class Question" Chapter 46 "Negro Workers!" Part 47 13. Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Crusader for Justice Part 48 14. William Edward Burghardt Du Bois Chapter 49 Excerpts from "The Conservation of Races" Chapter 50 Excerpts from The Souls of Black Folk Part 51 15. The Niagara Movement, 1905 Part 52 16. Hubert Henry Harrison, Black Revolutionary Nationalist Part 53 Section 3. From Plantation to Ghetto: The Great Migration, Harlem Renaissance, and World War, 1915-1954 Part 54 1. Black Conflict over World War I Chapter 55 "Close Ranks" Chapter 56 "The Descent of Du Bois" Chapter 57 "Returning Soldiers" Part 58 2. "If We Must Die" Part 59 3. Black Bolsheviks: Cyril V. Briggs and Claude McKay Chapter 60 "What the African Blood Brotherhood Stands For" Chapter 61 "Soviet Russia and the Negro" Part 62 4. Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association Chapter 63 "Declaration of Rights of the Negro Peoples of the World" Chapter 64 "An Appeal to the Conscience of the Black Race to See Itself" Part 65 5. "Women as Leaders" Part 66 6. Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance Chapter 67 "The Negro Artist and