Volunteer Tourism: Experiences that Make a Difference (inbunden)
Format
Inbunden (Hardback)
Språk
Engelska
Antal sidor
240
Utgivningsdatum
2001-10-01
Upplaga
illustrated ed
Förlag
CABI Publishing
Illustratör/Fotograf
illustrations
Illustrationer
illustrations
Dimensioner
242 x 162 x 16 mm
Vikt
480 g
Antal komponenter
1
ISBN
9780851995335
Volunteer Tourism: Experiences that Make a Difference (inbunden)

Volunteer Tourism: Experiences that Make a Difference

Inbunden Engelska, 2001-10-01
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Volunteer tourism describes a field of tourism in which travellers visit a destination and take part in projects in the local community. Projects are commonly nature-based, people-based or involve restoration of buildings and artefacts. Contemporary volunteer tourism has tended to suffer from a lack of differentiation from other forms of tourism or volunteering, falling into areas such as alternative tourism, international volunteering, social work and conservation corps work. The aim of this book is to provide it with a more specific identity. This book provides: An overview of the phenomenon of volunteer tourism, its sources and its development as a concept a focus on the potential positive social and environmental benefits of volunteer tourism, and the prerequisites for a successful experience.
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"Tourism research, it appears, is wallowing helplessly in a morass of types, definitions, and theoretical positions that frequently conflict and, when considered together, invariably confuse. Although Volunteer Tourism contributes in many ways to tourism studies, its attempt at conceptual clarification may well stand as its greatest gift to this field. ... [A]lternative tourism, particularly the volunteer kind, is hardly the norm in today's tourism industry ... Nevertheless, Wearing recommends that tourist operators ensure local participation in tourism developments and do so by building on such resources as community skill, knowledge, and culture. To the extent this is done, alternative forms of tourism can exist independently of mass tourism as well as become a vehicle with which tourist communities can effect greater control over their own destinies."--Robert A. Stebbins, FRSC, University of Calgary, Canada "Tourism research, it appears, is wallowing helplessly in a morass of types, definitions, and theoretical positions that frequently conflict and, when considered together, invariably confuse. Although Volunteer Tourism contributes in many ways to tourism studies, its attempt at conceptual clarification may well stand as its greatest gift to this field. ... [A]lternative tourism, particularly the volunteer kind, is hardly the norm in today's tourism industry ... Nevertheless, Wearing recommends that tourist operators ensure local participation in tourism developments and do so by building on such resources as community skill, knowledge, and culture. To the extent this is done, alternative forms of tourism can exist independently of mass tourism as well as become a vehicle with which tourist communities can effect greater control over their own destinies."--Robert A. Stebbins, FRSC, University of Calgary, Canada "Tourism research, it appears, is wallowing helplessly in a morass of types, definitions, and theoretical positions that frequently conflict and, when considered together, invariably confuse. Although Volunteer Tourism contributes in many ways to tourism studies, its attempt at conceptual clarification may well stand as its greatest gift to this field. ... [A]lternative tourism, particularly the volunteer kind, is hardly the norm in today's tourism industry ... Nevertheless, Wearing recommends that tourist operators ensure local participation in tourism developments and do so by building on such resources as community skill, knowledge, and culture. To the extent this is done, alternative forms of tourism can exist independently of mass tourism as well as become a vehicle with which tourist communities can effect greater control over their own destinies."--Robert A. Stebbins, FRSC, University of Calgary, Canada "Tourism research, it appears, is wallowing helplessly in a morass of types, definitions, and theoretical positions that frequently conflict and, when considered together, invariably confuse. Although Volunteer Tourism contributes in many ways to tourism studies, its attempt at conceptual clarification may well stand as its greatest gift to this field. ... [A]lternative tourism, particularly the volunteer kind, is hardly the norm in today's tourism industry ... Nevertheless, Wearing recommends that tourist operators ensure local participation in tourism developments and do so by building on such resources as community skill, knowledge, and culture. To the extent this is done, alternative forms of tourism can exist independently of mass tourism as well as become a vehicle with which tourist communities can effect greater control over their own destinies."--Robert A. Stebbins, FRSC, University of Calgary, Canada

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Innehållsförteckning

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION i: Experiences that make a difference ii: Historical context of alternative tourism iii: Selves in the Tourism Experience iv: Operators, Communities and Volunteer Tourism v: The Santa Elena Experience vi: A new approach CHAPTER 2: ALTERNATIVE TOURISM EXPERIENCES v: Situating Volunteer Tourism Within the Context of the Alternative Tourism Experience vi: Commodification and the Tourism Industry vii: Volunteer Tourism and the Tourism Industry CHAPTER 3: VOLUNTEER TOURISM EXPERIENCES viii: Youth Challenge International (YCI) ix: Introducing the Interacting Elements x: The Ecotourism Element xi: The Volunteer Element xii: Serious Leisure Element xiii: The Elements and Interactionism CHAPTER 4: EXPLORING THE EXPERIENCE xiv: The Volunteers xv: Similarities and Variations xvi: Motivation xvii: Motivation Categories xviii: Summary of Motivation xix: How Do the Volunteers Define Themselves? xx: Constructing a Framework to Examine the Data CHAPTER 5: THE VOLUNTEER TOURIST'S EXPERIENCE - SELF AND IDENTITY xxi: The Relational Elements of the Alternative Tourism Experience xxii: Environment/Nature xxiii: Interaction/Exchange/Group xxiv: Primary Influences on the Self and Identity CHAPTER 6: THE SITE, SOCIAL VALUE AND THE SELF xxv: Social Value, Identity and the Alternative Tourism Experience CHAPTER 7: DEVELOPING THE SELF THROUGH THE VOLUNTEER TOURISM EXPERIENCE xxvi: Framing the experience xxvii: Personal development in volunteer tourism experiences xxviii: Personal Awareness and Learning xxix: Interpersonal Awareness and Learning xxx: Confidence xxxi: Self-Contentment xxxii: Conceptualising the development of self xxxiii: The selves of volunteer tourism CHAPTER 8: THE IMPACTS ON COMMUNITIES: MOVING BEYOND THE PASSING GAZE xxxiv: Resisting the impact of global capital in developing countries xxxv: The challenge of community involvement xxxvi: The quest for sustainability xxxvii: Empirical explorations of commodification in volunteer tourism a): 'World Expeditions': the market denying nature and traditional community b): 'Adventure World': market colonisation of local communities c): 'One World travel': guest-host dialogues beyond colonisation xxxviii: Natural resource conservation through volunteer tourism xxxix: Beyond the passing gaze CHAPTER 9: VOLUNTEER TOURISM: MOVING ON FROM THE EMPTY MEETING GROUND xxxx: The Self and Community xxxxi: Towards a sociology of volunteer tourism experiences