Nuclear  Waste Management and Legitimacy (häftad)
Format
Häftad (Paperback / softback)
Språk
Engelska
Antal sidor
116
Utgivningsdatum
2015-05-22
Förlag
Routledge
Illustrationer
black & white illustrations
Dimensioner
228 x 158 x 12 mm
Vikt
204 g
Antal komponenter
1
Komponenter
49:B&W 6.14 x 9.21 in or 234 x 156 mm (Royal 8vo) Perfect Bound on White w/Gloss Lam
ISBN
9781138900936
Nuclear  Waste Management and Legitimacy (häftad)

Nuclear Waste Management and Legitimacy

Nihilism and Responsibility

Häftad Engelska, 2015-05-22
569
Skickas inom 10-15 vardagar.
Fri frakt inom Sverige för privatpersoner.
Boken kan tyvärr inte levereras innan julafton.
Finns även som
Visa alla 3 format & utgåvor
Nuclear technology places special demands on society and both nuclear weapons and nuclear energy for peaceful purposes require a large measure of security and monitoring at the international level. This book focuses on nuclear waste management, which can work in democratic countries only if viewed as legitimate by the population. This book posits the inability of democracies to establish such legitimacy as an explanation for the current absence of public policy decisions that can identify a solution. The problems are such that they can be resolved only if fundamental aspects of the modern notion of legitimacy are set aside.
Visa hela texten

Passar bra ihop

  1. Nuclear  Waste Management and Legitimacy
  2. +
  3. Between Artifacts and Texts

De som köpt den här boken har ofta också köpt Between Artifacts and Texts av Anders Andren (inbunden).

Köp båda 2 för 2218 kr

Kundrecensioner

Har du läst boken? Sätt ditt betyg »

Bloggat om Nuclear Waste Management and Legitimacy

Övrig information

Mats Andren is Professor of History of Ideas and Science, at the Department for Literature, History of Ideas, and Religion, University of Gothenburg

Innehållsförteckning

Introduction: a Faustian Bargain 1. Elusive Legitimacy 2. Legitimacy and Ethics 3. God is Dead: Nihilism or Responsibility 4. The Uncomfortable Legitimacy 5. Moral Culture and the Formulation of Norms Conclusion: Legitimacy without Responsibility