Early Modern Catholics, Royalists, and Cosmopolitans (e-bok)
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Språk
Engelska
Antal sidor
388
Utgivningsdatum
2015-07-28
Förlag
Ashgate Publishing Ltd
ISBN
9781409418726
Early Modern Catholics, Royalists, and Cosmopolitans (e-bok)

Early Modern Catholics, Royalists, and Cosmopolitans E-bok

English Transnationalism and the Christian Commonwealth

E-bok (PDF - DRM), Engelska, 2015-07-28
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Early Modern Catholics, Royalists, and Cosmopolitans considers how the marginalized perspective of 16th-century English Catholic exiles and 17th-century English royalist exiles helped to generate a form of cosmopolitanism that was rooted in contemporary religious and national identities but also transcended those identities.Author Brian C. Lockey argues that English discourses of nationhood were in conversation with two opposing 'cosmopolitan' perspectives, one that sought to cultivate and sustain the emerging English nationalism and imperialism and another that challenged English nationhood from the perspective of those Englishmen who viewed the kingdom as one province within the larger transnational Christian commonwealth.Lockey illustrates how the latter cosmopolitan perspective, produced within two communities of exiled English subjects, separated in time by half a century, influenced fiction writers such as Sir Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, Anthony Munday, Sir John Harington, John Milton, and Aphra Behn. Ultimately, he shows that early modern cosmopolitans critiqued the emerging discourse of English nationhood from a traditional religious and political perspective, even as their writings eventually gave rise to later secular Enlightenment forms of cosmopolitanism.
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