Collected Essays of Arthur Miller (e-bok)
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Språk
Engelska
Antal sidor
536
Utgivningsdatum
2016-03-31
Förlag
Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN
9781472591760
Collected Essays of Arthur Miller (e-bok)

Collected Essays of Arthur Miller (e-bok)

E-bok (PDF - DRM), Engelska, 2016-03-31
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This comprehensive volume brings together essays by one of the most influential literary, cultural and intellectual voices of our time: Arthur Miller. Arranged chronologically from 1944 to 2000, these writings take the reader on a whirlwind tour of modern history alongside offering a remarkable record of Miller's views on theater. They give eloquent expression to his belief in 'the theater as a serious business, one that makes or should make man more human, which is to say, less alone'. Published with the essays are articles that Miller had written and in-depth interviews he has given.This collection features material from two earlier publications: Echoes Down the Corridor and The Theater Essays of Arthur Miller. It is edited and features a new introduction by Matthew Roudan , Regents Professor of American Drama at Georgia State University. 'Arthur Miller understands that serious writing is a social act as well as an aesthetic one, that political involvement comes with the territory. A writer's work and his actions should be of the same cloth, after all. His plays and his conscience are a cold burning force.' Edward Albee
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