Telehor: Facsimile Reprint and Commentary (häftad)
Format
Häftad (Paperback / softback)
Språk
Engelska
Antal sidor
138
Utgivningsdatum
2013-05-01
Förlag
Lars Muller Publishers
Medarbetare
Gruber, Klemens (ed.), Botar, Oliver (ed.)
Illustratör/Fotograf
56
Illustrationer
56 Illustrations, unspecified
Dimensioner
285 x 209 x 13 mm
Vikt
861 g
Antal komponenter
1
Komponenter
Ringheftung
ISBN
9783037782538
Telehor: Facsimile Reprint and Commentary (häftad)

Telehor: Facsimile Reprint and Commentary

Häftad Engelska, 2013-05-01
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In 1936 the first and only issue of the magazine telehor (Greek for tele-vision) was released in four languages, as a special edition on and by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy. To celebrate its 75-year anniversary a facsimile reprint of the magazine will be produced, accompanied by a commentary volume. The magazine dealt with the question, how do aesthetic possibilities arise out of technical In 1936 the first and only issue of the magazine telehor (Greek for tele-vision) was released in four languages, as a special edition on and by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy. The facsimile reprint of the magazine is accompanied by a commentary volume. The reprint makes the magazine accessible again in terms of its artistic and theoretical historical dimensions. Particular attention has been paid to the production process. Thus the volume appears spiral-bound, an ultramodern technique in the mid-1930s. The commentary contains an editorial statement that places the magazine, telehor, in the context of the art and media of the 1920s and 1930s and unlocks the position of the artistic avant-garde at the intersection of two epochs. It also contains new translations of the original texts: in Mandarin, Russian, Hungarian and Spanish.
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Lazlo Moholy-Nagy (1895 -1946) is one of the central figures of the European avant-garde. His move from Budapest through Vienna to Berlin, his call to the Bauhaus in Weimar/Dessau by Gropius in 1923, his flight from the Nazis first to the Netherlands, then to London, and finally to Chicago, where he became director of the "New Bauhaus" and founded the "School of Design", all these stations set the horizon for his poly-artistic research.