The Image of the Other as Enemy (häftad)
Format
Häftad (Paperback)
Språk
Engelska
Antal sidor
76
Utgivningsdatum
2006-11-01
Upplaga
illustrated ed
Förlag
Silkworm Books
Illustrationer
5 illus.
Dimensioner
214 x 138 x 7 mm
Vikt
140 g
Antal komponenter
1
ISBN
9789749361993
The Image of the Other as Enemy (häftad)

The Image of the Other as Enemy

Radical Discourse in Indonesia

Häftad, Engelska, 2006-11-01
159
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This book analyzes the systematic construction of the image of the Other (that is, non-Muslims) by two radical Islamic Groups, Hizbut Tahrir Indonesia and Majelis Mujahidin Indonesia. The author documents discourse patterns in the groups' publications and speeches stereotyping non-Muslims as hostile towards Islam and imagining Islam's imminent victory after an inevitable clash with all other civilizations. Although these groups do not engage in physical violence, the author categorizes their efforts to stereotype non-Muslims as "symbolic violence" and counterproductive because of the religious and ethnic pluralism of Indonesian society.
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Innehållsförteckning

ForewordIntroduction--Majelis Mujahidin Indonesia--Hizbut Tahrir IndonesiaThe Image of the Other As Enemy--Constructing the ImageAnalyzing the Image of the Other--Roots of the Image--Discourse Patterns Used in Constucting the ImageSymbolic ViolenceFlaws in the Fundamentalist Arguments--Critiquing the Four-Fold Discourse--Another Flawed Arguement: Perpetual Conflict--Misleading Selections from Religious TextsFundamentalism as a Resistence MovementSummary and ConclusionsNotesReferences